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This is where you start: Salesforce Platform Handbook


 One of the early challenges that I faced while learning Salesforce, almost eight years back, is that it was too big of a cookie to eat. It still is. Salesforce Platform is huge- it has many products, integrations, different design patterns, different coding standards and Reid Carlberg is always experimenting with something next!!!. On top of that, new developers and admins are walking into the fold with their ideas of coding, the uncertainty of the job and a massive task at hand- learn this new technology that starts with a dot com. The task is daunting. 
Salesforce on its part is very forthcoming to help the community- with its trailhead, online videos, webinars, and certification programs. But too much information in itself is not a very helpful start of a career. At times like these- you sometimes wish, you could take a deep breath, pause, reflect and say - ok this is where I start.
That moment is exactly why the new book - Salesforce Platform App Builder Certification Handbook is written for. This is where you start- this book is going to do enough to get you started, your first gear, your first step, your first app. It is going to give you the taste of the whole platter that you have to consume, one bite at a time. This book is for the beginner admins who want to know if Salesforce is more than the keyword, this book is for the beginner developers who want to jump head-first into the platform and this book for the professionals who moved from different technology and have a lot to unlearn before accepting Salesforce.
In a way- this book is the second edition of the Force.com Developer Certification Handbook that was published in 2012- but since the exam has changed, so has the syllabus and so has the book. Salesforce Platform App Builder Certification Handbook is written in the pattern of the exam and is updated till Spring 16.  
It will help you to prepare for the platform app builder certification exam. We begin with designing the object model and look at the options for building page layouts. It will guide you through designing the interface while introducing the Lightning Process Builder. Next, we will implement business logic using various point and click features of Force.com. We will learn to manage data and create reports and dashboards. We will then learn to administer the force.com application by configuring the object-level, field-level, and record-level security. These and many other fundamental topics are in place for you to learn. By the end of this book, you will be completely equipped to take the Platform App Builder certification exam.
The book is out there for you to buy. 
This is where you start. All the best.

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